Archive for the ‘Doug’s Original Work’ Category

Dr. Doug’s Key Book Summaries and Answers from The #140edu Conference in NYC

Monday, August 1st, 2011

On August 3rd, I was on a panel moderated by Shelly Terrell at the prestigious #140edu conference at the 92nd Street YMCA in Manhattan. Click here for the video. Here are links to my book summaries that you should read if you want to better understand what’s wrong with most schools today. I have also included my answers to Shelly’s questions. Click the title above to see them.

Drive: Daniel Pink http://bit.ly/jl7ara

The Myths of Standardized Tests: Harris, Smith, & Harris http://bit.ly/lJLUNR

Catching Up or Leanding the Way: Youg Zhaohttp://bit.ly/mrUNnj

Managing the Millennials: Espinoza, Ukleja, & Rusch http://bit.ly/n8KVCY

Readicide: Gallaghar http://bit.ly/qk7oNY

Failure of the Standards Movement: Stedman http://bit.ly/pr6rxk

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter Share this page via Google Plus

Dr. Doug’s Multimedia Talk: Resources for Schools

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2015

On December 23, 2015, I gave a presentation on social media for educators to the staff at the Unatego Central School District in Upstate New York. During the talk I referred to the references below that for the most part stand on their own. Enjoy and share with educators you know.

Put this in the wall: Don’t post ANYTHING, ANYWHERE that you wouldn’t want ANYONE to see EVER! That goes for email too. If an email or any post makes you angry, your best reply is “let’s talk — tomorrow.”

You did review digital citizenship and online behavior prior to sending the kids off on the winter break, didn’t you? Research shows an increase of incidents related to sexual content and a spike in the number of students observed for depressive, self-harm, and suicidal issues during this time. Do you know who has this responsibility in your school?

Social Media and Your Reputation

Social media gives EVERYONE (that includes educators) one more way to get in trouble. What kind of trouble? See
Dr. Doug’s slides from his social media talk – This is a pdf file.

Your Facebook Online Reputation Can Help or Hurt Your Future. This is a great video to show students. @JoshOchs @safesmartsocial

Six Ways to Stay on Top of What Kids Are Doing Online

Doug at Stonehenge
Good Selfie?
Bad Selfie
Bad Selfie?

What is the Periscope app? Social Media Safety Guide – There is a lot of good social media advice here. @JoshOchs @safesmartsocial

But What About Sex?

Cave Painting
Grecian Urn
Adult Content Has Driven New Media Since the Beginning of Time.
If you want to read some research on the topic, type “Students viewing Internet porn research” into your favorite search engine or click here.
2015 Stats on Internet Porn – There is data here from many surveys that shows how often students of various ages and adults from various demographics view Internet porn. The big question is what should parents and teachers do about it?

Revenge Porn – What happens to the racy pictures you sent to your boyfriend when he becomes your ex-boyfriend?

Confessions of an orgy addict If you think Tinder is bad, how about 3rinder? Other special sites includ Grindr, JDate, and Christian Mingle. @JaneRidleyNY @nypost

Social Media for Communicating with Parents and Building Your Brand

Check out now New Milford High School in New Jersey uses social media.
If your school isn’t using social media to promote itself and communicate, consider starting a student club to do it.
Twitter People With the Most Followers – See if you can guess before you look.
I don’t advise 1:1 electronic communication with students. Let students post questions to a blog where all students can see the question and your answer. If inappropriate questions or comments come in, take them down and talk to the student in private.
How many kids don’t have access at home? Do you know who they are? Who teaches copyright issues? Have your read your school policy lately?

Social Media for Professional Development and Student Learning

Shouldn’t every educator have their own professional development plan? Social media can facilitate this.
Step one: Join Twitter and attend some Twitter chats. Start with #Edchat at noon and 7pm EST every Tuesday.
There are hashtags for every specialty in education.
Top Teacher Resource Blogs
How to Use Social Media for Professional Development
If you want your own personalized daily paper go here. Here is the link to my 12/15/2015 paper.

Students should have a larger audience.

Teachers should too. Do your teachers and students have blogs? Do students get to see their best work posted on the Internet? Why not?
How One Teacher Uses Her Blog – Note that top student work is posted her also. Is there student work on your blog?
If you want students to search for something that interests them Digg Here.
Should you punish students for social media behavior outside of school? It isn’t unusual for schools to receive viral criticism for over punishing kids. Here is one school that did. Hip-Hop Stars Support Mississippi Rapper in First Amendment Case.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter Share this page via Google Plus

Drumming In The New Year – Women On Drums

Monday, December 26th, 2011

To follow up on my Christmas post featuring young women on guitar (still available, scroll down), I feature young female drummers for New Years who are invading another male bastion. My goal is to entertain both genders and inspire young women to drum on. Happy New Year and thanks for making DrDougGreen so popular. Click title to see all videos.

An all girl drum group from South Korea is as good as it gets. Here we have The Drumcats on the street. Next we have The Drumcats on stage. If you want more, you get nine minutes of The Drumcats on stage with several routines.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter Share this page via Google Plus

Five ways hectically busy school leaders can stay on track – by Douglas W. Green, EdD at @tesusa

Thursday, November 17th, 2016

Trying to run a school can feel like a game of Whack-a-Mole, but there are ways to keep winning.
Want to keep up with the latest education news and opinion? Follow TES USA on Twitter and like TES USA on Facebook.

Wack a Mole

As a principal, I was fond of saying “if you don’t have ADHD when you take the job, you will have it two weeks later”. I supervised 70 adults and dealt with 530 students and their parents, as well as my follow administrators and the Superintendent.

It only took a small subset of this hoard to want my attention at the same time for the job to seem like playing the ‘Whack-a-Mole’ carnival game.

Anyone who aspires to this job needs to realize this and be prepared to deal with it. As a principal for 13 years, I believe I managed the hectic pace with success, so for anyone who wants this job or who already has it, here are my top tips on how to stay on track.

Click here for the entire post.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter Share this page via Google Plus

Happy New Year – Check Out My New Book

Monday, January 1st, 2018

May your 2018 be all you and those you love expect and need. Take time to rest and recharge, and set some new goals. One of my goals for 2017 was to finish and publish a book. I hope you will consider picking up a copy and sharing it with anyone you know who has the power to make some needed changes. It’s time to move past one-size-fits-all instruction and a failed test-based accountability system among other things. Join me in this vital fight.

Thanks so much for your support and if you are looking for some New Year’s diversion, check out my previous posts and archives. Happy New Year and God bless.

Rocket Science Book

Teaching Isn’t Rocket Science, It’s Way More Complex: What’s Wrong with Education and How to Fix Some of It by Doug Green

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter Share this page via Google Plus

If Supporting Student Passion Is So Important, What If They Don’t Have Any?

Tuesday, June 12th, 2018

Teaching Isn't Rocket Science

My informal research has found that many if not most students lack serious interests let along a passion for anything worthy of academic effort. When I ask students what they are interested in or what they want to major in someday, I often get little more than a shrug. So what should we do?

What My Blogging Effort Reveals

  • Every day I surf the Internet searching for resources for my audience of parents and educators. I have found a number of themes that show up often. These themes form the basis of my recent book Teaching Isn’t Rocket Science, It’s Way More Complex: What’s Wrong With Education and How to Fix Some of It. (Purchase at Amazon — Executive summary) In it I deal with themes like the importance of relationships, personalizing instruction, and the harm caused by standardized testing.

So what should we do?

  • One reoccurring theme is that teachers should allow students time to pursue their interests and passions rather than being forced to only study the school’s standard curriculum. I like this idea. In some schools, students are allowed to study what they want on a regular basis. This resembles Google’s 20% time where employees can do what they want one day each week and let everyone know what they accomplish. Other schools weave student interests and passions into project-based learning.

Most Lack Passion

  • While this sounds good, my informal research has found that many if not most students lack serious interests let along a passion for anything worthy of academic effort. When I ask students what they are interested in or what they want to major in someday, I often get little more than a shrug. I don’t count passions for things like social media or computer games as topics that we should turn students lose to study in school, although I’m sure creative teachers can work them in somehow.

Convince the Teachers

  • We need to convince teachers that it’s important for students to find interests and passions about topics that could lead towards a career. The next step is to suggest ways they can help students find their passion as part of their current teaching practice. I don’t think this should be too difficult. Regardless of what one teaches, one can make an effort to simply expose students to as many potentially interesting aspects of their discipline as possible.

Be Direct

  • Tell students directly that it is their job to find things they are interested in as they encounter new things anywhere and to make notes of what they find attractive. They should turn in a list of things that they would like to explore further. The teacher then carves out time for individual exploration that can be online and hands on. Students need to be responsible for reporting on what they find.

Put Student Work On a Blog

  • A classroom blog can help. With help from the school IT staff it should be easy for students to post their work. Once posted, the teacher, their classmates, and parents can see evidence of growing passions. Students should be allowed to continue with a subject of interest or to explore something else. This seems possible and I believe that it would serve the students well and accomplish the vision of many people with strong expertise in the field of education.

Who is Dr. Doug Green

  • Doug has been an educator since 1970. After teaching chemistry, physics, and computer science, he became an administrator for the next 30 years with experience at the secondary, central office, and elementary levels. He has also taught a number of leadership courses for The State University of New York at Cortland and Binghamton University and authored over 300 articles in computer magazines and educational journals. In 2006 he gave up his job as an elementary principal to care for his wife who had Lou Gehrig’s disease. After her death in March of 2009 he decided to see how I could use my expertise to help busy educators and parents hone their skills and knowledge and started this blog.
Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter Share this page via Google Plus

London Calling – Tips from Dr. Doug’s travels in England

Sunday, July 13th, 2014

After nine days in London I have recommendations for your bucket list. It’s a great trip for educators, parents, and children of any age. Museums are amazing and free, but some special exhibits have entrance fees. Below are links to pictures from those I visited. All cater to school groups as every museum should.

I also recommend Golden Tour’s day trips from London. I took two and each stopped at three sites. I was dropped off on my own so I didn’t have to walk about with a crowd. Prices were right and tour guides were excellent. Check my Facebook album for pictures from my trip. I stayed with my niece and her family, but if you don’t have relatives in London, see if some of your Twitter followers are up for a visit. For my regular readers there are some of my Net Nuggets at the bottom.

London Museum of Natural History – This is much bigger than it’s counterpart in New York City with lots more dinosaurs.
Science Museum of London – The best science museum I have been to and I have been to many.
V & A Museum of London – This is more like a smaller version of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City but it’s by no means small.
Tate Modern Museum of London – If you like modern and abstract art this is the place for you. Even if you don’t it is a pretty cool space.
Tate British Museum of London – This place is chuck full of great paintings. I liked it better than the Tate Modern. You can go from the Tate Modern by boat.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter Share this page via Google Plus

March Madness – UPDATED 4/1/2010!

Friday, March 19th, 2010

Updated 4/1/2010 after announcement of round one winners (Start with slide 15 for update.) I couldn’t help but notice how the current madness associated with the Race to the Top finalists and the Obama Administration’s blueprint for reauthorization of NCLB are analogous to the other madness associated with March. Don’t forget that the secretary of education was a basketball player. Thanks to information from the New York Times, Education Week, and my own thinking, I have a humorous (I hope) and factual take on the current status. Let me know what you think (dgreen@stny.rr.com).

Click here to see Dr. Doug’s March Madness..

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter Share this page via Google Plus

NCLB Ethnic Groups are Stupid

Saturday, August 14th, 2010

Current NCLB rules require schools to show progress for each of five approved ethnic groups in addition to kids who are poor regardless of ethnic group. I see these groups as somewhat arbitrary and I believe that keeping track of groups serves no real purpose and complicates our efforts. I believe that poverty is the one thing we should focus on. I hope you agree that the slideshow linked below helps make this case. It may take a minute or two to download as it is mostly pictures.

Click here to see my Diversity Slideshow .

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter Share this page via Google Plus

Nobody interviews for a living.

Thursday, October 15th, 2009

Interviews are less predictive of job performance than work samples, job-knowledge tests, and peer ratings of past job performance. Even a simple intelligence test is dramatically more useful. This is according to Dan and Chip Heath, authors of Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die. The article can be found in the January issue of Fast Company. (www.fastcompany.com) They cite studies that show that the only thing interviews correlate with is the ability to interview. People who think they are good at judging people in interviews need to think again. A college transcript is based on four years of the cumulative evaluation of 20 to 40 professors. If you think you can do better after an interview, I admire your self-esteem but not your judgment. So what does an administrator do? Simple, watch someone teach. Better yet, get input from people you trust who have seen the person in action. They are more likely to see the real thing as anyone can turn it on when the boss walks through. Listen carefully for indications of teaching talent rather than superficial judgments like those you would gather during an interview.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter Share this page via Google Plus